How to use Unity NavMeshes with LoadLevelAdditive (aka “A Dirty NavMesh Hack”)

Unity Pro has a nice feature for baking and navigating via NavMeshes. In Unity Pro (4.x), a baked NavMesh is associated with a saved “Scene”. Most of the time, this is all well and good, but as others have discovered, sometimes this simplification / limitation poses a problem when you want to use LoadLevelAdditive or LoadLevelAdditiveAsync. The current NavMesh is always the one from the last scene that was loaded via LoadLevel or LoadLevelAsync. This poses a problem if you say, have a fast loading title screen (scene A) which then uses LoadLevelAdditiveAsync to load the main level (scene B) containing the guts of the game, including the baked NavMesh you want to use. The NavMesh in scene B won’t be loaded.

To solve this, I discovered a (hackish) workaround that involves associating a single baked NavMesh with two scenes, via editing the Scene file in text mode (TLDR; the NavMeshSettings section in .unity Scene files defines the NavMesh for that scene. It appears two scenes can point to the same NavMesh. Gentlemen, start your Vim’s & Emacsen !).

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Def visual tests

The last few weeks I’ve been working on a post-compo version of my tower defensish LD48 game “Def”. Apart from fixing the obvious balance and stalemate issues that pretty much everyone discovered in the ‘survival mode’ after the deadline (thanks for all the screenshots !), I’m adding a campaign mode with some story elements. It’s shaping up to be pretty awesome so far :)

Shooter range diffuse, below transparent grid.

Shooter range diffuse, below transparent grid.

Shooter range transparent, above diffuse grid.

Shooter range transparent, above diffuse grid.

Shooter range transparent, BELOW transparent grid.

Shooter range transparent, BELOW transparent grid.

 

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A response to Cargo Cult Nostalgia

A response to “Cargo Cult Nostalgia” by Peter Silk (maker of the amusing nautical exploration game “The Wager”). You should read that article first (edit: and be sure to read Peter’s comments below), else this probably won’t make any sense.

I essentially agree that the Cargo Cultists might be sometimes fooled by the feeling of nostalgia and focus on the ‘trappings’ as a proxy for the real attributes that they enjoy in a game. But I also think it’s unfair to dismiss all their requests as driven by purely ‘nostalgia endorphins’. Some of these requests no doubt come from their dissatisfaction with design decisions taken for many modern point-and-click adventures that aim to broaden their target market and as a result fail to satisfy a certain type of player.

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